Tag Archives: Tri-Factor Philippines

Biag and Malolot Top Tri-Factor Philippines Asian Championship Series  

Billy Biag flashed superb form and dominated the long distance triathlon while Mark Malolot held off Jade Albar in the standard distance as they shared top honors in the Tri-Factor Philippines Asian Championship Series at the Camsur Watersports Complex in Camarines Sur on 26-27 May 2018.

Long distance tri participants preparing for the swim start.

Biag clocked 3:19:04 to rule the grueling 1.5K swim-60K bike-15K run event beating Renel Brecenio (3:27:05) by almost eight minutes while Anthony Llaguno III clocked 3:50:30 to place third overall, capping the two-day novel triathlon (tri), which featured a four-leg mass participation series composed of individual swim, bike, run events, and a finale tri.

Triathlete Malolot ruled the 1.5K swim-40K bike-10K run in 2:27:31 foiling Albar, who clocked 2:31:09 while Ryan Laurino placed third overall in 2:38:43 followed by Edgar Cabalero (2:46:37) and Ricky Busran (2:51:59) .  Actor Gerald Anderson of Team De Rosa clocked 1:16:15 to win in the 25-29 Age Group (AG) Sprint Division.  Ms. Earth Air 2016 Michelle Gomez finished her maiden tri in the Freshmen Division.

Ms. Earth Air Michelle Gomez and  Bert Lozada Swim School managing director and swim coach Angelo Lozada being interviewed by event host Elle Adda during the Kids and Freshmen awarding ceremony and Media Night .

Likewise, Biag topped the 35-44 AG with Breceno claiming the crown in the 25-34 AG. Topping the female side of the 25-34 AG was  Regina Rosquites.  The Tri-Factor Philippines  served as the third leg of this year’s Asian Championship Series and hosted by CamSur.  Athletes also provided school supplies and slippers to over 200 indigent kids under the Race to Give Program of Sanctband facilitated by Tri-Factor Philippines marketing arm One of a Kind Marketing.

“I’m looking forward to another cheerful event next year.  The people, the place and CamSur are just amazing,” said Elvin Ting, managing director of organizing Orange Room Pte Ltd. and Tri-Factor series founder.

Sharing the spotlight are the top finishers of the relay in the Open Division of the long distance triathlon led by Bolima Madler, Platilla Margarito, and Lagyap Marino with a time of 3:02:32. Hezron Vasquez, Gil Peña Jr., and Dave de Vera finished in 3:18:47 to capture second place, while the relay team of Ruben Mariano, Inocencio Parza, and Dennis Suz clocked 3:27:36 to  garner third place.

“When you’re focused on finishing the race, it is the most amazing feeling. Nothing else matters, but to see yourself cross the finish line,” said Governor Migs Villafuerte. Representative LRay Villafuerte together with the young CamSur Governor graced the event. Under Armour ambassador and concert vocalist Elle Adda hosted the event.

Kids and Freshmen participants posed for a photo op with guests and organizers before the start of the inaugural Tri-Factor Asian Championship Series in CamSur.

Malolot also took the crown in the 16-24 AG category with Laurino ruling the 25-34 AG  and Busran topping the 35-44 AG of the event. Winners gained berths in the Tri-Factor Series in Thailand plus an overnight stay in Caramoan islands.

In the sprint distance (740m swim-20K bike-5Krun), John Caleb Barlin took the overall crown with a 1:08.29 clocking beating Louie Ibo and Roman Bonagua who timed 1:12.52 and 1:14.46 respectively.  They also took the top three places in the 16-24 AG category.

Junior Oba topped the 30-44 AG in 1:29.43 while Aldo Turiano took the crown in the 45 and above AG category  in 1:33.40 while Faith Robertson (16-29 AG) and Keigh Pascual (30-44 AG) reigned in the Women’s Division clocking 1:27.28 and 1:32.30 respectively.

Tri-Factor Asian Championship Series celebrated their 10th year by having a four-leg mass participation series in countries across Asia such as Malaysia, China, Indonesia, and Thailand. The next Tri-Factor series will be held in Thailand on 17 June 2018.

Press Release: Stellar Field All Primed Up for TRI-Factor Series

Multisport newbies, enthusiasts, and veteran triathletes set out for a new challenge as they showcased their skills in swimming, biking and running in the TRI-Factor Asian Championship Series earlier today at the Camsur Watersports Complex.

A big number of athletes in the region are vying in the four-leg mass participation series composed of individual swim, bike, and run events, and a finale triathlon staged to promote an active and healthy lifestyle particularly among the youth.

📷 credit to Tri-Factor Philippines ; One of a Kind Marketing

The TRI-Factor has grown from organizing multisport events in Singapore to creating the premier short-course championship series across the Asian region with CamSur hosting the third leg of the Asian Series and it comes at a time when local triathlon is enjoying tremendous boom with top notch events held regularly across the country the last few years.

📷 credit to Tri-Factor Philippines ; One of a Kind Marketing

Spicing up this weekend’s event is the participation of celebrity Gerald Anderson and Ms Earth Air 2016 Michelle Gomez.

📷 credit to FrancRamon.com

Anderson did the sprint and fellow Team De Rosa mainstays.  Gomez finished her Freshmen distance triathlon debut on Saturday afternoon.

📷 credit to Tri-Factor Philippines ; One of a Kind Marketing

The event held in conjunction with the Kaogma Festival celebration featured a “Race to Give” project where TRI-Factor racers  get to award school supply kits to every indigenous child right after they finish the race as part of TRI-Factor’s corporate social responsibility.

Host province led by Gov. Migs Villafuerte, welcomed all participants during the race kit collection.

📷 credit to Tri-Factor Philippines ; One of a Kind Marketing

Action also heated up today with the TRI-Factor long and standard distance triathlon slated from 6:30 AM to 12 noon and the TRI-Factor sprint distance triathlon set from 7 AM to 11 AM.  The awards rites will be held from 1 PM to 3 PM to be followed by the Let’s Party@Kaogma Festival bash.

For other details, visit www.trifactorph.com.

Find Your Strong

I was out jogging around the neighborhood when a thought struck me.  “What is that sport that I can do at my own time, at my own pace, and not so expensive?” Running was the answer.  Well, I thought it wasn’t expensive, but it turned out I was wrong. It was sometime in 2007.

From finishing a three-kilometer benefit run to marathons to ultramarathons—be they road or trail races—it made me move forward to continuously challenge myself.  To be honest, I did not know I could run more than 42 kilometers or even more than a hundred kilometers at the same time, exposed to the elements, or running under the scorching heat of the sun, or running in the rain.   But my first love was swimming.  I first learned to swim late in life. In fact, I was already in my 20s when I first learned the basics of swimming, but it was never too late to try something new.

Combined with my ability to run, I experienced my first aquathlon race, a 400m swim-7K run-400m swim, in Corregidor Island in 2009.  The following year, I had the chance meeting in person at an event, one of the living legends in the arena of ultramarathon running, Scott Jurek.  At some point that day, he signed autographs for the attendees.  What I received from Scott was, “Running Diva, dig deep!” he told me.  I was impressed, and began to think what it meant. In the end, it took me five years to fully understand the implications of the value of what he wrote.  For in mid-February of 2015, I got my first road bike from two great friends.  Yeah, it was a second-hand bike from owners who like me were also runners.  Let us anonymously named these two as Maui and Coach Ige.  Owning a bike now, I signed up for the first time a 40-kilometer bike race having no formal fitness training in cycling.  More about this crazy cycling story here.  Later that same year, I signed up for 2016 Cobra IRONMAN 70.3.   It’s IRONMAN 70.3, Running Diva! It was my way of testing my limits to bring me closer to what Scott wrote.  Dig deep.  You’re in.   Daunting!

A triathlon (tri) is a multiple-stage competition involving three disciplines of swimming, cycling, and running.  The format is always like that.  Swim, bike, and run.  A triathlete trains and devotes time for each discipline.  Another important aspect of triathlon includes two transitions. Transition one or T1 swings from swimming to cycling.  Transition two or T2 changes from cycling to running.  And the time accumulated to change in these two transitions are included in overall time of a triathlon.  The usual progression of a beginner triathlete is to usually transition from Sprint distance to Olympic distance to Half Ironman to long course triathlon, and finally, to Ironman. Or, to some athletes they progress by joining multisport events such as aquathlon (swim-run) and duathlon (bike-run) before attempting triathlon.

In 2016, I trained and completed my first Half Ironman distance triathlon in Cebu City.  Prior to this, I only had completed (and won third place in my Age Group) a Sprint and two-kilometer open water swimming. I believe my background in running really helped me complete the competition. It was not perfect, not really fast, but I finished strong.  That was my goal.  And, I achieved it.

The races that followed after finishing the Half Ironman distance were Sprint and Standard courses. Earlier this year, I have run a marathon in Cebu City, and raced in a cycling event in Indonesia, a UCI Gran Fondo World Series Tour de Bintan that included stand-alone events like the 17K Individual Time Trial and the 144K Gran Fondo Classic.  Both of these cycling events were geared to finishing an Ironman in the near future.  Crossing my fingers.

Now talking of tri, this brings me to the exciting part of this post about this upcoming event happening this month, the TRI-Factor Asian Championship Series.  The action will take place  on May 25 to 27 at the Camarines Sur Watersports Complex. It features various tri distances to test the mettle of the veteran triathletes, beginners, and enthusiasts. This is such a huge boost for this growing sport across the Asian region since most countries such as ours, Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia, and China have the best beaches ideal for a tri race. In our country alone, with so many to choose from, the islands have hidden coves and beautiful sandy beaches for such a demanding sport that requires courses for swimming, biking, and running.  I have known some friends who will be doing this tri race.  And, I wish them all the best of luck!

With tri getting so much attention, is it the new strong?  Maybe.  Possibly. So what your strong? Swimming? Biking? Or, doing other fitness sports? To “find your strong” means whatever sport you are in and as long you put time, and is passionately pursuing it, not one sport is stronger than the other.  In my IMHO, what makes the sport strong is because of you.  Yes, you, the athlete.

Having the strong mindset, the willingness to appreciate mental preparation training (at the expense of losing your social life, well, temporarily, of course), striking the right work life balance, learning techniques to improve performance, and dealing with stressors, setbacks including losses are what makes you strong. Almost all sports have these elements. It will be like this: 90% mental and the other percentage is for physical.

You are strong when you put your heart to it. You are strong when you stay committed and focus. You are strong that even when you fail or lost or knock down (or you crash, or you are in a cast because of a fracture), you get right back up.

A real winner doesn’t have to be a title holder or a gold medalist.  I have had my share of going up on the podium and collecting medals and trophies. To me, the real winner is when you do whatever it takes to achieve your goal, and be the best you can be, the Best Version of Yourself.   

TRI-Factor Asian Championship Series Now in the Philippines

Local triathlon gets further boost as top Asian multisport brand TRI-Factor holds the third leg of its Asian Championship series in Camarines Sur in May with a slew of rising and leading triathletes in the region expected to see action.

Put up to provide multisport beginners, enthusiasts, and veteran triathletes or even kids a venue to hone their talent and skills in swimming, biking, and running, the TRI-Factor have grown from organizing multi-sport events in Singapore to creating the premier short-course championship series across the Asian region.

It features kids triathlon (100m swim-5K bike-1K run), freshmen triathlon (200m swim-10K bike-2K run), sprint triathlon (750m swim-20K bike-5K run), standard triathlon (1.5K swim-40K bike-10K run) and long triathlon (1.5K swim-60K bike-15K run).

“We’re pleased to announce the TRI-Factor Asian Championship series with new races in the Philippines, Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia, and China. Our purpose is to provide our athletes diverse race options throughout the year, catering to the specific needs of the athletes across Asia,” said Elvin Ting, managing director of organizing Orange Room Pte Ltd. and Tri-Factor series founder.

The 2018 Asian Championship series will kick off in Singapore on April 22 then to China on May 13 before action shifts to the Philippines on May 25 to 27 at the CamSur Watersports Complex in Camarines Sur.

The TRI-Factor is also staged to promote an active and healthy lifestyle, particularly among the youth, and its Asian Championship leg will be held here for two years— 2018 and 2019, where hosting of more events including new race formats like Cycle-Run-Cycle are being looked into. Its staging in the country comes at a time when local triathlon is enjoying tremendous boom with top-notch events held regularly across the country in the last few years.

“Tri-Factor’s coming to the Philippines would be a great opportunity and new challenge for the newbies to engage in triathlon and pioneer triathletes to take the opportunity of racing in other parts of Asia especially in China under a different triathlon format. I’m looking forward to be in both the Philippine and China legs of Tri-Factor and I am really excited to go back to CWC, which is a great venue for a triathlon,” shared Taguig Congresswoman and triathlete Pia Cayetano upon learning about Tri-Factor’s arrival in the Philippines.

Founded in 2009, TRI-Factor is aimed at building a community and culture of Asian athletes racing with the region with its short distances and secured courses allowing beginners to master swimming, cycling, and running and prepare them for the regular triathlon events. Each TRI-Factor race finish gives athletes points counting toward a year-end ranking. For the Asian Championship series, each race will be assigned a Race Course index depending on the degree of difficulty where points awarded will be multiplied with the index, allowing athletes to rack up bigger points at the tougher races.

Titles at stake are the Series Asian, Best Country Athlete of the Year, Best Country Junior Athlete of the Year, Best Veteran Country Athlete of the Year, Top First-Timer Athlete, and Top First-Timer Junior Athlete.